Monday, November 23, 2009

Formica et Scarabaeus (Furia)

I haven't had time to work on this blog lately, but I got a very interesting request from a teacher who needed a public domain translation of the fable of the ant and the dung-beetle. This is not a very well-known fable. To my knowledge, it is only found in the Greek prose collections (in Chambry, it is Fable 241 = Perry 112), and I don't actually own the rights to my Oxford translation. So, I was not sure what to do... but then I remembered that in the wonderful edition of the Greek prose fables by Franciscus de Furia (Fabulae Aesopicae, published in 1810) there are Latin translations of the Greek. So here is what I have done: I took the Latin version by de Furia and translated that into English - which I can release here without any concerns for copyright. Meanwhile, I've also included the Latin for anyone who is interested!
Formica aestivo tempore arva circumiens, frumentum ac hordeum colligebat, sibique, ut vesci posset hieme, recondebat. Hanc videns, Scarabaeus, ingentum quidem eius laborem atque sollicitudinem est admiratus, quod nimirum eo tempore, quo animalia cetera, labore remisso, otia trahunt, ipsa contra ita labori insudaret. Ad haec Formica tunc nihil respondit. Postea vero, cum hiems advenisset, atque fimus, nimio imbre perfusus, omnino madefactus esset, Scarabaeus fame correptus ad eam se contulit, ac, ut aliquid cibi daret, enixe rogavit. Cui illa, Si tum, Scarabaee, escam tibi comparasses, cum me laborantem increpabas, nunc profecto non indigeres. Pari modo, qui ubertatis causa nullam futuri curam habent, conversis deinde temporibus, calamitatibus maximis opprimuntur.
Here is the English translation of the Latin:
While it was summer, the Ant went around the fields, gathering grains and barley, and she stored this away for herself in order to have something to eat during the winter. Watching the Ant, the Dung-Beetle was amazed at how worried the Ant was and how much work she was doing. Apparently while all the other animals had put aside their work for the summer and were taking it easy, the Ant was sweating and working hard. The Ant had nothing to say to the Dung-Beetle at that time but later, when winter came, and the dung was completely soaked by the winter rains, the Dung-Beetle, stricken with hunger, came to the Ant and begged her urgently to give him something to eat. The Ant then said to him: "Dung-Beetle, if you had prepared some food for yourself when you were making fun of me for working, then you would have plenty to eat." The same is true about people who in a time of prosperity do not think about the future; then, when times change, they find themselves in terrible trouble.
Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) - as you can see, if the dung gets wet during the winter rains, the poor dung-beetle would definitely not be able to roll it up into a nice ball!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, August 24, 2009

102. Bos et Iuvencus (Irenaeus)

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is Bos et Iuvencus, the story of a hard-working ox and a frivolous calf. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 3oo.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Bovem aetate iuxta et labore confectum Iuvencus, comptus ac petulans, iugi adhuc expers, intuens, irridebat, exprobrans scabram pellem, cutem rugosam, et cervicem iugo attritam, plaustri denique duram necessitatem; et contra vegetae aetatis suae statum, otia, lascivias efferebat; nequicquam respondente aut mussitante Bove. Non diu post, cum solemnes sacrorum dies recursarent et pro sacrificio quaereretur victima, Bos dimittitur, Iuvencus rapitur immolandus, quem, dimisso iam capite et lento gressu, cum ad aram duceretur, Bos videns, "Nolim (inquit), O mi frater, afflicto tibi afflictionem dare, sed cum ita sors tulerit, tuo iam experimento comperi verum esse quod olim audivi: vecordem esse iuventutem, sed ubi petulantia adolescentiae iungitur, vix e malis emergere, sapuisses forte, si senuisses.

Bovem
aetate iuxta et labore confectum
Iuvencus,
comptus ac petulans,
iugi adhuc expers,
intuens,
irridebat,
exprobrans
scabram pellem,
cutem rugosam,
et cervicem iugo attritam,
plaustri denique
duram necessitatem;
et contra
vegetae aetatis suae
statum,
otia, lascivias efferebat;
nequicquam respondente
aut mussitante Bove.
Non diu post,
cum
solemnes sacrorum dies
recursarent
et pro sacrificio
quaereretur victima,
Bos dimittitur,
Iuvencus rapitur
immolandus,
quem,
dimisso iam capite
et lento gressu,
cum ad aram duceretur,
Bos videns,
"Nolim (inquit),
O mi frater,
afflicto tibi
afflictionem dare,
sed
cum ita sors tulerit,
tuo iam experimento comperi
verum esse
quod olim audivi:
vecordem esse iuventutem,
sed ubi petulantia
adolescentiae iungitur,
vix e malis emergere,
sapuisses forte,
si senuisses.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, August 22, 2009

101. De Adolescente et Hirundine (Irenaeus)

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Adolescente et Hirundine, the story of a young man who did not realize that "one swallow does not a summer make." In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 169.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Effrenus quidam ac dissolutus Iuvenis, cum inter ganeonum greges bona sua in popinis et luxuriis abligurisset, ut nil reliqui praeter vestem haberet, visa Hirundine, existimavit actum esse de hieme, ver adventasse; confestimque vestem vendidit, et pretium eius ludis et solitis compotationibus impendit; sed cum paulo post, recrudescente frigore, dirissime algeret, visa alia Hirundine, et ipsa paene frigore enecta, O pessima avicula, dixit, quam male auguraris! Decepisti me, et simul decepta es. Ostendit inconsideratae iuventutis indolem temere et sine consilio se in errores praeceipitem agentem.

Effrenus quidam
ac dissolutus Iuvenis,
cum
inter ganeonum greges
bona sua
in popinis et luxuriis
abligurisset,
ut nil reliqui
praeter vestem haberet,
visa Hirundine,
existimavit
actum esse de hieme,
ver adventasse;
confestimque
vestem vendidit,
et pretium eius
ludis et solitis compotationibus
impendit;
sed
cum
paulo post,
recrudescente frigore,
dirissime algeret,
visa alia Hirundine,
et ipsa paene frigore enecta,
O pessima avicula, dixit,
quam male auguraris!
Decepisti me,
et simul decepta es.
Ostendit
inconsideratae iuventutis indolem temere et sine consilio
se
in errores
praeceipitem agentem.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, August 20, 2009

100. De Delectore Militum (Irenaeus)]

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Delectore Militum, the story of how appearances can be deceiving in military recruitment. This is not a fable I've seen anywhere else; it looks like a companion piece to the story about the unprepossessing race-horse story from yesterday.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Quidam, a Duce suo missus ut Milites conscriberet, attendebat maxime externam oris et corporis speciem in iis qui sese ipsi offerebant; quos inter unus eminebat, corporis habitudine et procera statura conspicuus, quem idcirco prae ceteris volebat deligere; et alium reiectare, minus bene natum, quem tamen omnes ut generosum et strenuum militem efferebant; et speciosum illum ut effeminatum et ignavum. Utriusque ergo nomen inscipsit, et effectu probavit quod dicebatur hominesque haud a specie externa iudicandos.

Quidam,
a Duce suo missus
ut Milites conscriberet,
attendebat maxime
externam oris et corporis speciem
in iis
qui sese ipsi offerebant;
quos inter
unus eminebat,
corporis habitudine
et procera statura
conspicuus,
quem idcirco
prae ceteris
volebat deligere;
et alium reiectare,
minus bene natum,
quem tamen
omnes
ut generosum et strenuum militem
efferebant;
et speciosum illum
ut effeminatum et ignavum.
Utriusque ergo nomen inscipsit,
et effectu probavit
quod dicebatur
hominesque
haud a specie externa
iudicandos.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

99. De Equo Despecto

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Equo Despecto, the story of a race-horse who runs better than he looks! This is not a fable indexed in Perry, but you can find it in Abstemius.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Cum ad proximos Circenses ludos Equi multi adducerentur, et producerentur in medium, iique elegantes, generosi, compti, aureis frenis et phaleris insignes, inter eos unus apparuit inelegans, et male curatus ac pexus, qui ab omnibus idcirco despectui habebatur, et indignus qui cum aliis concurreret; sed cum cursu probandi proluderent, et is ceteros longo post se intervallo relictos superaret, tum demum omnes mirari et dicere ab externa specie de rebus minime iudicandum, sed a virtute et generositate, quae se per opus probat et innotescit.

Cum
ad proximos Circenses ludos
Equi multi adducerentur,
et producerentur in medium,
iique elegantes,
generosi, compti,
aureis frenis et phaleris
insignes,
inter eos
unus apparuit
inelegans,
et male curatus ac pexus,
qui
ab omnibus idcirco
despectui habebatur,
et indignus
qui cum aliis concurreret;
sed
cum
cursu probandi
proluderent,
et is
ceteros
longo post se intervallo
relictos superaret,
tum demum
omnes mirari
et dicere
ab externa specie
de rebus
minime iudicandum,
sed a virtute et generositate,
quae
se per opus probat
et innotescit.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, August 01, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 98: Vulpes et Pardus

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Vulpe et Pardo, the story of the debate between the fox and the leopard about the true meaning of beauty. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 12.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Altercabantur Vulpes et Pardus de pulchritudine, qua in re Pardus longo intervallo existimans superare Vulpem, ostentabat pellis suae varietates, et contra Vulpinae fuliginem et fuscum colorem multis deprimebat. Vulpes autem, cum ab illa parte se superari cerneret: Iactas (inquit) varietates tuas in pelle; ego maiores habeo in mente. Et quanto anima praestat corpore, tanto specie te praecello. Indicat in homine magis attendi pulchritudinem mentis, quam cutis aut pellis.

Altercabantur
Vulpes et Pardus
de pulchritudine,
qua in re
Pardus
longo intervallo
existimans superare Vulpem,
ostentabat
pellis suae varietates,
et contra
Vulpinae fuliginem
et fuscum colorem
multis deprimebat.
Vulpes autem,
cum ab illa parte
se superari cerneret:
Iactas (inquit)
varietates tuas in pelle;
ego
maiores habeo in mente.
Et quanto
anima praestat corpore,
tanto
specie te praecello.
Indicat
in homine
magis attendi
pulchritudinem mentis,
quam cutis aut pellis.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) by Milo Winter:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, July 31, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 97: Lepus et Vulpes, De Nobilitate

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Lepore et Vulpe, the story of the fox and the rabbit debating their respective virtues. This is another fable from Abstemius.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Orta est aliquando contentio Vulpem inter et Leporem de nobilitate et praestantia. Ego te, dicebat Lepus Vulpi, praecello cursu. Ego te, respondebat Vulpes, mente. Ille: Sum te velocior pedibus. Ista: Ego ingenio, quo venatorum retia et plagas et canes saepius eludo, quam tu celeritate pedum. Docet non a dotibus corporis, sed mentis, metiendam cuiuscumque excellentiam.

Orta est aliquando
contentio
Vulpem inter et Leporem
de nobilitate et praestantia.
Ego te,
dicebat Lepus Vulpi,
praecello cursu.
Ego te,
respondebat Vulpes,
mente.
Ille:
Sum te velocior pedibus.
Ista:
Ego ingenio,
quo
venatorum retia
et plagas et canes
saepius eludo,
quam tu
celeritate pedum.
Docet
non a dotibus corporis,
sed mentis,
metiendam
cuiuscumque excellentiam.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) showing a sculpture of a fox and a rabbit; if you have time, visit the website to see some more wonderful artwork like this:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 96: Canis et Asinus, Socii

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Cane et Asino, the story of a dog who recruited a donkey as his ally in the war with the wolf. This is a funny little story that I have not seen anywhere else that I can remember; is anybody familiar with other sources for this story?

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Canis domesticus, de eorum genere quos vocant molossos, bellum gerens cum lupo, cum se viribus imparem crederet, socium pugnae sibi asciscendum putavit; et contemplatus de vicino Asinum, praegrandi corpore instructum, voce, tonitrui instar, rudentem, clitellis, velut thorace, armatum, inde reputans strenuum et bellicosum, rogavit in consortium pugnae, et, ut sperabat, certae victoriae. Acceptam habet invitationem Asinus, promittit se non defuturum. Ergo tali commilitone Canis factus audacior, provocat Lupum. Is descendit in arenam, sed ubi eum eminus conspexit Asinus, sine mora, proripit se e lycaeo et, concito cursu, horribiliter rudens et prae timore crepitans ac stercorans omnia, fugae praesidium sumit. Quod advertens Canis, et ipse fugit, dicens, Heu me infortunatum! Putavi Achillem habere, et inveni Thersitem. Certe a specie externa de quoquam minime est iudicandum.

Canis domesticus,
de eorum genere
quos vocant molossos,
bellum gerens cum lupo,
cum
se viribus imparem
crederet,
socium pugnae
sibi asciscendum
putavit;
et
contemplatus de vicino
Asinum,
praegrandi corpore instructum,
voce, tonitrui instar, rudentem,
clitellis, velut thorace, armatum,
inde reputans
strenuum et bellicosum,
rogavit
in consortium pugnae,
et, ut sperabat, certae victoriae.
Acceptam habet invitationem
Asinus,
promittit
se non defuturum.
Ergo
tali commilitone
Canis factus audacior,
provocat Lupum.
Is descendit in arenam,
sed ubi
eum eminus conspexit
Asinus,
sine mora,
proripit se e lycaeo
et,
concito cursu,
horribiliter rudens
et prae timore crepitans
ac stercorans omnia,
fugae praesidium sumit.
Quod advertens Canis,
et ipse fugit,
dicens,
Heu me infortunatum!
Putavi Achillem habere,
et inveni Thersitem.
Certe
a specie externa
de quoquam
minime est iudicandum.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source), here's a funny picture of a real donkey-and-dog pair:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 95: Vulpes et Caput Humanum

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Vulpe et Capite humano, the story of a fox who found a human head (in this case, from a statue; in other versions, the fox finds an actor's mask). In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 27.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Vulpes, sculptoris officinam ingressa, reperit caput humanum ex marmore singulari artificio elaboratum, quod pedibus anterioribus, quasi manibus, amplexans et curiosius contemplans, exclamavit, O quale sine cerebro caput, magno cum sensu ac ingenio fabricatum, sensus licet et ingenii expers. Tales sunt plerumque homines specie externa corporis, aut fortunae indulgentia, seu munere, sublimes, ingenio autem ac virtute, hominum larvae atque umbrae.

Vulpes,
sculptoris officinam ingressa,
reperit caput humanum
ex marmore
singulari artificio elaboratum,
quod
pedibus anterioribus,
quasi manibus, amplexans
et curiosius contemplans,
exclamavit,
O quale sine cerebro caput,
magno cum sensu ac ingenio
fabricatum,
sensus licet
et ingenii expers.
Tales sunt
plerumque homines
specie externa corporis,
aut fortunae indulgentia,
seu munere,
sublimes,
ingenio autem ac virtute,
hominum larvae atque umbrae.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) by Walter Crane:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, July 27, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 94: Asinus et Heri Eius

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Asino, novos semper heros quaeritante, the story of the donkey who is always hoping to get a better master, but who instead gets worse ones. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 179.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Asinus olitoris, aegre sustinens laborem quo herus eum premebat, conqueritur de eo apud Iovem, supplicat alium sibi dari; exaudit Iupiter; iubet figulo veneat. Mutatur herus, sed non minuitur labor, imo augescit: semper lutum, tegulae, lateres, imbrices, dorso portandae. Iterum ad Iovem; Iupiter, oratoris importunitate victus, dat coriarium. Statim expertus eum, omnibus quos unquam habuerat longe crudeliorem, apud se lamentans dicebat: Heu me miserum! Ut omnia mihi in deterius cedunt: nam in eum incidi dominum, qui vivo non parcit, nec mortuo; ipse enim ubi corpus meum flagris exhauserit, in fine excoriabit.

Asinus olitoris,
aegre sustinens laborem
quo
herus eum premebat,
conqueritur de eo
apud Iovem,
supplicat
alium sibi dari;
exaudit Iupiter;
iubet figulo veneat.
Mutatur herus,
sed non minuitur labor,
imo augescit:
semper
lutum, tegulae,
lateres, imbrices,
dorso portandae.
Iterum ad Iovem;
Iupiter,
oratoris importunitate victus,
dat coriarium.
Statim expertus eum,
omnibus
quos unquam habuerat
longe crudeliorem,
apud se lamentans
dicebat:
Heu me miserum!
Ut omnia
mihi in deterius cedunt:
nam
in eum incidi dominum,
qui vivo non parcit,
nec mortuo;
ipse enim
ubi corpus meum
flagris exhauserit,
in fine excoriabit.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 93: Columbae, Milvus et Accipiter

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Columbis Accipitrem pro Rege recusantibus, the story of the foolish doves who chose the hawk to be their king. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 486.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Dum invicem confligerent Milvus et Columbae, istae Milvi viribus impares, opem Accipitris implorant, et regem suum faciunt: ille vero non defensoris, sed tyranni partes agens, eas praedatur, depascit, rapit. Agnoscunt errorem suum Columbae, sed sero, melius esse unum, quam duos simul sustinere hostes, maxime si alter eorum sit domesticus. Propterea Accipitri non egere amplius ope sua, renuntiant, ad sua se recipiat. Ostendunt quam grave sit iugum cuiuscumque ferre imperantis.

Dum invicem confligerent
Milvus et Columbae,
istae
Milvi viribus impares,
opem Accipitris implorant,
et regem suum faciunt:
ille vero
non defensoris,
sed tyranni partes agens,
eas praedatur, depascit, rapit.
Agnoscunt errorem suum
Columbae,
sed sero,
melius esse unum,
quam duos
simul sustinere hostes,
maxime
si alter eorum
sit domesticus.
Propterea
Accipitri
non egere amplius ope sua,
renuntiant,
ad sua
se recipiat.
Ostendunt
quam grave sit
iugum
cuiuscumque ferre imperantis.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, July 24, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 92: Ranae et Rex Earum

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Ranis Regem postulantibus, the story of the frogs who foolishly wanted a king. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 44.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Ranae, regem habere cupientes, Iovi supplicant sibi dari regem; risit Iupiter ad vota ranarum, illae interim clamant et coaxare non desinunt, donec earum importunis clamoribus victus, e caelo demisit in earum stagnum immanem trabem, cuius cadentis fragore attonitae, initio siluere, sed postea audaciores, sensim accedere, desuper desultare, garrire, et ludibrio habere coeperunt; redeunt ad Iovem, querulae, non trabem se, sed regem velle, qui cor, os et sensum habeat. Iupiter, fremens, mittit loquacibus bestiis Ciconiam, quae, paludem perambulans, quotquot obvias habet, vivas devorat. Redeunt iterum ad Iovem, nec sic se velle regem, alium petunt, sed frustra, non audit importunas loquaces, ut propterea queri et coaxare non desinant, talis est conditio mortalium, ut nemo subiici velit.

Ranae,
regem habere cupientes,
Iovi supplicant
sibi dari regem;
risit Iupiter
ad vota ranarum,
illae interim clamant
et coaxare non desinunt,
donec
earum importunis clamoribus
victus,
e caelo demisit
in earum stagnum
immanem trabem,
cuius cadentis fragore
attonitae,
initio siluere,
sed postea audaciores,
sensim accedere,
desuper desultare, garrire,
et ludibrio habere coeperunt;
redeunt ad Iovem,
querulae,
non trabem se,
sed regem velle,
qui
cor, os et sensum habeat.
Iupiter, fremens,
mittit loquacibus bestiis
Ciconiam,
quae,
paludem perambulans,
quotquot obvias habet,
vivas devorat.
Redeunt iterum ad Iovem,
nec sic se velle regem,
alium petunt,
sed frustra,
non audit importunas loquaces,
ut propterea
queri et coaxare non desinant,
talis est conditio mortalium,
ut nemo subiici velit.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 91: Leo et Homo, De Fortiore

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Leone et Homine, the story of the lion and the man who debated about which of them was the stronger. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 284.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Leo et Homo, simul iter facientes, inter confabulandum in hanc incurrunt quaestionem, uter eorum altero esset fortior nobiliorque; quisque commendare se, certatimque allegare quae poterat in sua causa. Sed cum uterque vincere, neuter alteri cedere, vellet, venerunt in quemdam locum, in quo columnae marmoreae visebantur, et in eis prominenti opere pugna Hominis et Leonis insculpata, illius Leonem pedibus atterentis ac suffocantis. Ad quod erectus homo, ad Leonem: Haec sculptura (inquit) nostram litem apposite dirimit terminatque, ostenditque quanto Leonibus antistent Homines. Cui Leo: Ita est (inquit), si vobis creditur. Sculptura haec hominis opera est, sed si Leones artem scribendi aut effigiandi callerent, pingerent utique Homines Leonibus substratos. Haec indicant innatam cuique dominandi appetentiam, aliosque sibi subdendi.

Leo et Homo,
simul iter facientes,
inter confabulandum
in hanc incurrunt quaestionem,
uter eorum
altero esset fortior nobiliorque;
quisque commendare se,
certatimque allegare
quae poterat
in sua causa.
Sed
cum uterque vincere,
neuter alteri cedere,
vellet,
venerunt in quemdam locum,
in quo
columnae marmoreae visebantur,
et in eis
prominenti opere
pugna Hominis et Leonis
insculpata,
illius Leonem pedibus
atterentis ac suffocantis.
Ad quod
erectus homo,
ad Leonem:
Haec sculptura (inquit)
nostram litem
apposite dirimit terminatque,
ostenditque
quanto
Leonibus antistent Homines.
Cui Leo:
Ita est (inquit),
si vobis creditur.
Sculptura haec
hominis opera est,
sed
si Leones
artem scribendi aut effigiandi
callerent,
pingerent utique
Homines Leonibus substratos.
Haec indicant
innatam cuique
dominandi appetentiam,
aliosque sibi subdendi.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 90: Lupus fluviatilis et Delphinus

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Lupo fluviatili, the story of the "wolf-fish" who lived in the river and who wanted to be king of the sea, a fable from Abstemius.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Lupus, piscis fluviatilis (cui inter pisces principatum Plinius suo aevo tribui scribit) ad insolitam molem increverat, devoratis multis piscibus, et tantum metum sui omnibus incusserat, ut pro rege aut tyranno fluminum haberetur timereturque. Igitur opinione suae potentiae mirum quantum tumens, coepit cogitare de imperio maris, et polliceri sibi, sicut fluviorum, sic Oceani se monstra subacturum. Sed vix ostia maris intraverat, cum occurrit ei Delphinus, tum mole corporis, tum pulchritudine, cum etiam pernicitate multis eo parasangis superior, qui eum quamprimum unde venerat, remeare coegit, monitum ambitioni suae metas ponere.

Lupus,
piscis fluviatilis
(cui
inter pisces
principatum
Plinius suo aevo
tribui scribit)
ad insolitam molem
increverat,
devoratis multis piscibus,
et tantum metum sui
omnibus incusserat,
ut pro rege aut tyranno fluminum
haberetur timereturque.
Igitur
opinione suae potentiae
mirum quantum tumens,
coepit cogitare
de imperio maris,
et polliceri sibi,
sicut fluviorum, sic Oceani
se
monstra subacturum.
Sed
vix ostia maris intraverat,
cum occurrit ei Delphinus,
tum mole corporis,
tum pulchritudine,
cum etiam pernicitate
multis eo parasangis superior,
qui
eum quamprimum unde venerat,
remeare coegit,
monitum
ambitioni suae
metas ponere.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) showing a dolphin:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 89: Rana et Bos

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Rana et Bove, the story of a frog who wanted to be as big as an ox. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 376.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Veniebat potum in stagno Bos crassus et pinguis, et multoties visus Ranis, cuidam Ranae desiderium incussit grandiorem fieri et crescere instar Bovis. Reputare se felicem, si ad eam molem posset pervenire; multo potu id fieri posse reputans, coepit ultra solitum et captum bibere, matre filiam frustra increpante, ac dicente, fore potius ut creparet rumpereturque, quam Bovis mensuram aequaret, etiam si totam paludem ebiberet. Crepem licet, mater mea, si possum, grandior fiam. Quid tandem? Paulo post bibendo crepuit media. Exemplo aliis quemque intra sortes suae terminos se continere debere.

Veniebat potum in stagno
Bos crassus et pinguis,
et multoties visus Ranis,
cuidam Ranae
desiderium incussit
grandiorem fieri
et crescere instar Bovis.
Reputare se felicem,
si ad eam molem
posset pervenire;
multo potu
id fieri posse reputans,
coepit
ultra solitum et captum
bibere,
matre
filiam frustra increpante,
ac dicente,
fore potius
ut creparet rumpereturque,
quam Bovis mensuram aequaret,
etiam si totam paludem ebiberet.
Crepem licet,
mater mea,
si possum,
grandior fiam.
Quid tandem?
Paulo post
bibendo crepuit media.
Exemplo aliis
quemque
intra sortes suae terminos
se continere debere.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) by Arthur Rackham:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, July 20, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 88: Aquila et Corvus

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Aquila et Corvo, the story of a crow who foolishly tried to imitate an eagle. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 2.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Aquilam desursum in gregem Haedorum devolantem et Caprum unguibus prehensum secum per inane asportantem, Corvus prospiciebat et aemulari gestiens prosilit in arietem, quem cum unguibus prendere nititur, ita se velleri implicat, irretitque quod inde se extricare et avolare nequit, Pastores id videntes accurrunt, eumque comprehendunt, avulsisque pennis illudunt, tum quodam percontante ab eo quae volucris esset, Corvus natura (inquit) mente Aquila fui; iam Corvum implumem me esse certo cognosco, qui utinam mea sorte contentus fuissem.

Aquilam
desursum
in gregem Haedorum devolantem
et Caprum
unguibus prehensum
secum per inane asportantem, Corvus prospiciebat
et aemulari gestiens
prosilit in arietem,
quem
cum unguibus
prendere nititur,
ita se velleri implicat,
irretitque
quod inde
se extricare et avolare nequit,
Pastores
id videntes accurrunt,
eumque comprehendunt,
avulsisque pennis illudunt,
tum
quodam percontante ab eo
quae volucris esset,
Corvus natura (inquit)
mente Aquila fui;
iam
Corvum implumem me esse
certo cognosco,
qui utinam
mea sorte contentus fuissem.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Sunday, July 19, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 87: Asinus et Scurra

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Asino et Scurra, the story of a donkey-qua-artiste! This is yet another fable that Irenaeus has taken from Abstemius.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Asellus, videns in platea civitatis Circulatorem et Scurram diversorum voces et cantus, seu avium, seu animalium imitando et crepitus edendo multae plebis risum movere, et non parvam inde expiscari pecuniam, indigne ferens pluris fieri Scurram quam se, Magistratum adit, conqueritur de favore impertito Scurrae, alios despici digniores; petit ab eo Magistratus quidnam artis sciret, quo se Scurrae praeferri vellet. Si de voce agitur? (inquit) Longe valentiori praeditus sum. Si de cantu? Suavius modulor, testimonio sint qui me quotidie audiunt, qui ubi me vocem efferentem audiunt omnes prae dulcedine modulationis meae risum tenere non possunt. De cetero, crepitus maiores et longiores edo, absque fetore ullo, addo et stercora ad cumulum. Qua responsione homo in risum effusus probavit iustam Asini aemulationem, et ut solebat, monuit perseverare.

Asellus,
videns
in platea civitatis
Circulatorem et Scurram
diversorum voces et cantus,
seu avium, seu animalium
imitando
et crepitus edendo
multae plebis risum movere,
et non parvam inde
expiscari pecuniam,
indigne ferens
pluris fieri Scurram quam se,
Magistratum adit,
conqueritur
de favore impertito Scurrae,
alios despici digniores;
petit ab eo Magistratus
quidnam artis sciret,
quo
se Scurrae praeferri
vellet.
Si de voce agitur? (inquit)
Longe valentiori praeditus sum.
Si de cantu?
Suavius modulor,
testimonio sint
qui me quotidie audiunt,
qui ubi
me vocem efferentem audiunt
omnes
prae dulcedine
modulationis meae
risum tenere non possunt.
De cetero,
crepitus maiores et longiores
edo,
absque fetore ullo,
addo et stercora ad cumulum. Qua responsione
homo
in risum effusus
probavit
iustam Asini aemulationem,
et ut solebat,
monuit perseverare.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source), showing a donkey braying:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, July 18, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 86: Cera Duritiem Appetens

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Cera, duritiem lateris appetente, the story of some wax that wanted to become hard as a brick. The fable comes from Abstemius.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Cera, videns se mollem et tractabilem, nimis dolebat conditionis suae vicem, cupiebatque lateris cocti soliditate donari, quod ut consequeretur, iecit se in fornacem ardentem, sed momento liquefacta, et igne consumpta, documento fuit: quemque in suo statu manere debere, nec appetere quod sibi a natura fuit negatum.

Cera,
videns
se mollem et tractabilem,
nimis dolebat
conditionis suae vicem,
cupiebatque
lateris cocti soliditate donari,
quod ut consequeretur,
iecit se
in fornacem ardentem,
sed momento liquefacta,
et igne consumpta,
documento fuit:
quemque
in suo statu manere debere,
nec appetere
quod sibi
a natura fuit negatum.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) showing a wax candle:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, July 17, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 85: Asinus et Catellus

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Asino et Catello, the sad story of how the donkey tried to win his way into his master's heart by acting like the master's beloved puppy dog. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 91.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Lusitantem cum Patrefamilias Catellum, modo pedes iocose morsicantem, modo vestes, modo ad collum et ora subsilientem, mensa etiam assidentem, cibos de manu heri recipientem, mille modis blandientem, et blanditiis vicissim affectum, contemplabatur Asinus domesticus de area et invidia rumpebatur; sortem suam memorans, ut qui quotidie clitellas et onera deportaret, nusquam otiaretur, male tonsus et pransus, insuper semper mala verba, saepius verbera exciperet. Coepit autem aliquando pensiculantius ruminare, quaenam huius rei causa esset, et apud se dicere: Forsitan, ob rusticitatem meam, quod hero non abblandior, non alludo, non assuavior; addiscamus (inquit) amare, ut contingat amari. Excutiendus pudor est. Igitur expectavit cum rediret domum Herus suus, cui intranti occurrit arrectis auribus et voce altissima rudens et ridens, in humeros subsilit, pulsat pedibus, ungulis, capite, arridet. Exclamare Herus, voce, manibus, baculo excipere, accurrunt servi, et infelix Asellus egregie vapulat et foris truditur. Tunc ad se rediens: Digne (inquit) vapulo, et meae temeritatis poenas luo, quod Asinum non decet, factitare volens.


Lusitantem cum Patrefamilias
Catellum,
modo pedes
iocose morsicantem,
modo vestes,
modo ad collum et ora
subsilientem,
mensa etiam assidentem,
cibos
de manu heri recipientem,
mille modis blandientem,
et blanditiis vicissim affectum,
contemplabatur
Asinus domesticus
de area
et invidia rumpebatur;
sortem suam memorans,
ut qui
quotidie
clitellas et onera deportaret,
nusquam otiaretur,
male tonsus et pransus,
insuper
semper mala verba,
saepius verbera exciperet.
Coepit autem aliquando
pensiculantius ruminare,
quaenam huius rei causa esset,
et apud se dicere:
Forsitan,
ob rusticitatem meam,
quod hero non abblandior,
non alludo, non assuavior;
addiscamus (inquit) amare,
ut contingat amari.
Excutiendus pudor est.
Igitur expectavit
cum rediret domum
Herus suus,
cui intranti
occurrit arrectis auribus
et voce altissima rudens
et ridens,
in humeros subsilit,
pulsat
pedibus, ungulis, capite,
arridet.
Exclamare Herus,
voce, manibus, baculo excipere,
accurrunt servi,
et infelix Asellus
egregie vapulat
et foris truditur.
Tunc ad se rediens:
Digne (inquit) vapulo,
et meae temeritatis poenas luo,
quod Asinum non decet,
factitare volens.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Barlow Fables at NoDictionaries.com, 1-30

Thanks to the great tool at NoDictionaries.com, I'm creating word lists for the fables in the Aesop's Fables in Latin book. A few words are not included in the word lists and I've noted those below. :-)

Barlow 1.DE LEAENA ET VULPE.

Barlow 2.DE CANE ET BOVE. Missing from the list is elatro, elatrare: bark, start barking.

Barlow 3.DE PARTU MONTIUM.

Barlow 4.DE MURE URBANO ET MURE RUSTICO. The word list does not recognize the compound word secum = cum se.

Barlow 5.DE CORNICE ET URNA. Several undefined words: sitibundus: thirsty; profundior, as the comparative form of profundus, deep; lapillulus, a diminutive form of lapis, stone; and iniecto, inectare: toss in.

Barlow 6.DE ACCIPITRE ET LUSCINIA.

Barlow 7.DE PAVONE ET GRUE. A couple of undefined words: formosior, the comparative of formosus: beautiful; supervolito, supervolitare: flitter, fly over

Barlow 8.DE AVIBUS ET QUADRUPEDIBUS.

Barlow 9.DE VULPE ET PARDO.

Barlow 10.DE RUSTICO ET SILVA. The word list did not recognize annitere, imperative form of the deponent verb annitor: strive, strain, try.

Barlow 11.DE RUSTICO ET ARATRO SUO.

Barlow 12.DE PASTORIS PUERO ET AGRICOLIS. The word list did not recognize exciebat, from excieo, exciere: to rouse, summon, stir up.

Barlow 13.DE LUPIS ET OVIBUS. The word list did not recognize lupulus, a diminutive of lupus: wolf.

Barlow 14.DE RANA ET BOVE.

Barlow 15.DE AUCUPE ET PALUMBE. The word list did not recognize nidulans: nesting.

Barlow 16.DE CICADA ET FORMICA.

Barlow 17.DE AGRICOLA ET CICONIA. The word list did not recognize depascor, depasci: feed on, eat up, lay waste.

Barlow 18.DE ACCIPITRE COLUMBAM INSEQUENTE.

Barlow 19.DE VULPECULA ET CICONIA. The word list did not recognize interlapsus, from the verb interlabor, interlabi: to pass by in intervals, slip by

Barlow 20.DE LEONE AMATORIO. The word list did not recognize delicatulus, diminutive form of delicatus: charming, tender, squeamish; and hamatus: hooked, bent.

Barlow 21.DE EQUO ET ASINO. Several words not recognized: proculco, proculcare: trample on; provolo, provolare: rush forward, dash ahead; ornatus (noun): adornment, decoration

Barlow 22.DE VULPE ET LUPO.

Barlow 23.DE LUPO OVIS PELLE INDUTO. The word list doesn't recognize aliquam as the feminine accusative singular of aliquis.

Barlow 24.DE VITULA ET BOVE. The word list did not recognize the noun immolatio: offering, sacrifice, or the form immolareris, imperfect subjunctive, 2nd person singular passive, from immolo: to sacrifice, offer in sacrifice.

Barlow 25.DE AUCUPE ET PERDICE. The word list did not recognize the adverb supplicabunde: in a pleading tone; and it did not recognize allecturam, future active participle from allicio, allicere: entice, lure

Barlow 26.DE LUPO ET SUE.

Barlow 27.DE MILVO AEGROTO. The word list did not recognize the adverb toties: so many times, so often.

Barlow 28.DE CANE MORDACI.

Barlow 29.DE VULPE ET UVA.

Barlow 30.DE LUPO ET GRUE. The word list did not recognize the dative form grui from grus: crane.

Barlow Fables at NoDictionaries.com, 31-60

Thanks to the great tool at NoDictionaries.com, I'm creating word lists for the fables in the Aesop's Fables in Latin book. A few words are not included in the word lists and I've noted those below. :-)

See a previous post for Fables 1-30.

Barlow 31: DE VULPE ET AQUILA. The word list does not recognize absumptura as a future active participle from absumo, abumsere: "consume, waste, lay waste"

Barlow 32: DE COLUMBIS ET ACCIPITRE.

Barlow 33: DE SENE ET MORTE.

Barlow 34: DE CERVO IN BOVIUM STABULO. The word list shows the archaic spelling for the word cervos, when the usual spelling is cervus. It also does not recognize the Late Latin form bovium; the classical form is boum, genitive plural of bos, "ox, cow." The word list also does not recognize the perfect form applausit from the verb applaudo, applaudere, "clap, applaud."

Barlow 35: DE RUSTICO ET COLUBRO. The word list does not recognize the gerund sibilando from the verb sibilo, sibilare, "hiss, whisper."

Barlow 36: DE EQUO ET ASELLO ONUSTO. The word list does not recognize coriarius, "tanner, leather-worker."

Barlow 37: DE LEONE ET MURE. The word list does not recognize the perfect participle abrosus, from the verb abrodo, abrodere, "chew through, gnaw off."

Barlow 38: DE GALLO GALLINACEO. The word list does not recognize the verb disiicio, disiicere, "scatter, break up." It also does not recognize the adjective fulgurans, "flashing, sparkling" and the noun gemmarius, "jeweler."

Barlow 39: DE AQUILA ET TESTUDINE. The definition "three" does not show up for the word tres. The word list does not recognize the adjectives tardigradus, "slow-paced, limping" and indefatigabilis, "untiring." It also does not recognize the perfect form arrepsit from the verb arrepo, arrepere, "creep up to, crawl towards."

Barlow 40: DE ASINO LEONIS PELLE INDUTO. The word list doesn't recognize the iterative verb territo, territare, "to scare, frighten (repeatedly)." It also doesn't recognize the supine noun rugitus, "roar."

Barlow 41: DE URSO ET ALVEARI. The word list does not recognize the diminutive apicula, "bee." It also did not recognize the imperfect form involabat, from the verb involo, involare, "fly at, attack."

Barlow 42: DE IUVENE ET HIRUNDINE. The word list does not recognize the verbs circumvolo, circumvolare, "fly around" and circumvago, circumvagari, "wander around." It also did not recognize the syncopated form enecasse = enecavisse, from the verb eneco, enecare, "kill, deprive of life."

Barlow 43: DE FORMICA ET COLUMBA. The word list did not recognize the diminutive form ramusculus, from ramus, "branch." It also did not recognize the future active participle tensurus from tendo, tendere, "stretch out, extend" and the gerund fricandi from frico, fricare, "scratching." For tibiale it only gives the definition "stocking," when the meaning you need here is the shin itself.

Barlow 44: DE MURE ET RANA. The word list did not recognize the Late Latin noun insultus (classical insultura), "leaping on, attack."

Barlow 45: DE LEONE SENE. The word list does not recognize the word deprivatus, "deprived, robbed of." It also did not recognize the superlative vilissimus, from vilis, "worthless, trashy."

Barlow 46: DE LEONE ET VULPE.

Barlow 47: DE VULPE, CANE ET GALLO. The word list does not recognize the Greek word oden, accusative of the feminine noun ode, "song, ode." It also did not recognize the verb expergiscor, expergisci, "wake, awaken." For utramque, it does not identify the word uterque, "both, each of two."

Barlow 48: DE LEONE ET URSO. The word list does not recognize hinnulus, "fawn." For utrosque, it does not identify the word uterque, "both, each of two."

Barlow 49: DE ALAUDA ET PULLIS EIUS.

Barlow 50: DE PISCATORE ET PISCICULO. The word list does not recognize forms of pisciculus, "little fish." It also does not know the noun smaris, smaridis, "picarel" (a type of fish, very small in size), the adjective futilis, "worthless, fruitless," and the comparative adverb luculentius, from luculenter, "brilliantly, splendidly." It also does not recognize the imperfect subjunctives adhiberem, from adhibeo, adhibere, "apply, put, use" and commutarem from commuto, commutare, "change, exchange."

Barlow 51: DE VULPE SINE CAUDA. The word list did not recognize the adverb indignabunde, "indignantly."

Barlow 52: DE TUBICINE CAPTIVO. The word list did not recognize adjective supplicabundus, "supplicating, pleading" and the verb concito, concitare, "stir up, excite."

Barlow 53: DE LUPO ET AGNO. The word list did not recognize the adjective sitibundus, "thirsting, thirsty."

Barlow 54: DE EQUO ET LEONE. The word list did not recognize the adjective spinosus, "thorny, full of thorns."

Barlow 55: DE CANE ET UMBRA. The word list did not recognize the adjective vorabundus, "greedy, voracious" and the verbs elatro, elatrare, "to burst out barking, howl" desipio, desipere, "act foolishly, be crazy."

Barlow 56: DE ANU ET ANSERE. The word list didn't recognize the superlative avarissimus from avarus, "greedy." It also did not recognize the compound form sublacto from the verb lacto, lactare, "allure, flatter, dupe."

Barlow 57: DE LEPORE ET TESTUDINE.

Barlow 58: DE QUERCU ET ARUNDINE. The word list did not recognize the comparative adjective validior, from validus, "strong, powerful" and the noun Notus, "south wind."

Barlow 59: DE HIRUNDINE ET ALIIS AVICULIS. The word list does not recognize the diminutive avicula, from avis, "bird." It also did not recognize the verb cohabito, cohabitare, "live together, live with."

Barlow 60: DE LEONE, ASINO ET GALLO.

Barlow Fables at NoDictionaries.com, 61-80

Barlow 61: DE CANE VETULO ET MAGISTRO. The word list does not recognize the perfect form praecelluit, from praecello, praecellere, "excel, surpass" and it also does not recognize the iterative verb form, pensito, pensitare, "to weigh, ponder, consider."

Barlow 62: DE DELPHINO ET SMARIDE. The word list does not recognize the name of the fish species smaris, "picarel." It also did not recognize the diminutive moribundulus, "dying."

Barlow 63: DE VULPE IN PUTEO. The word list does not recognize the noun saeta, "hair, bristle," or the adjective sitibundus, "thirsty" or the compound verb, perbibo, "drink up" or the compound pronoun uterque, "each of two, both." For some reason it also did not recognize the vocative hirce from hircus, "goat." It also did not recognize the syncopated perfect forms descendisses, from descendo, "go down" and exploravisses, from exploro, "search out, investigate."

Barlow 64: DE SATYRO ET VIATORE. The word list did not recognize the verbs refocillo, refocillare, "warm to life again, revive" and sufflo, sufflare, "blow, puff."

Barlow 65: DE URSO ET DUOBUS VIATORIBUS. The word list does not recognize the verbs incepto, inceptare, "begin, undertake" and susurro, susurrare, "whisper." It also did not recognize the perfect participle constratus from consterno, "spread out, lie down."

Barlow 66: DE LEONE ET QUATTUOR TAURIS.

Barlow 67: DE LEONE ET MURE. The word list did not recognize the diminutive tantillus, "such (a little)." It also does not recognize the participle rugiens, from the verb rugio, rugire, "roar, bellow"

Barlow 68: DE CERVO IN AQUAS INSPICIENTE. The word list does not recognize the genitive plural tibialium, from tibiale, "shin" and the participle circumlatrans, from circumlatro, "barking, barking all around." It also does not recognize the diminutive, moribundulus, "dying." For some reason, it does not recognize ultimus as an adjective.

Barlow 69: DE CATTO ET MURIBUS. The word list does not recognize the late Latin word cattus, meaning "cat." It also did not recognize the gerund devorando, from devoro, "gobble up, devour," the adjective vorabundus, "greedy, devouring," or the dative form of patrifamilias, from paterfamilias, "head of the household."

Barlow 70: DE NUTRICE ET LUPO. The word list did not recognize the future active participle traditurus, from trado, "hand over."

Barlow 71: DE AGRICOLA ET FILIIS. The word list does not recognize the future form praebebitis from praebeo, "put forward, offer, provide."

Barlow 72: DE CATTO ET VULPE. The word list does not recognize the late Latin word cattus, meaning "cat," the poetic adjective odorus, "scented, keen-scented," and the gerund aufugiendum, from aufugio, "run away, flee." It also does not recognize the compound pronoun meipsum = me ipsum and the compound verb praeservo, praeservare, "keep, preserve, save."

Barlow 73: DE LEONE ET QUIBUSDAM ALIIS QUADRUPEDIBUS. The word list does not recognize the verbs irrugio, a compound of rugio, "roar, bellow," sudo, sudare, "sweat" and vendico, vendicare, "claim, avenge."

Barlow 74: DE ANU ET ANCILLIS. The word list does not recognize the future active participle dormiturus, from dormio, "sleep."

Barlow 75: DE CATTA IN FEMINAM MUTATA. The word list does not recognize the late Latin word catta (feminine of cattus), meaning "cat,"

Barlow 76: DE HERINACEIS VIPERAS HOSPITES EIICIENTIBUS. The word list does not recognize herinaceus, one of the many Latin spellings for "hedgehog." It also does not recognize the participle eiiciens, from the verb eiicio, "toss out, throw out."

Barlow 77: DE RANIS ET EARUM REGE. The word list did not recognize the noun lusus, "sport, game." It also does not recognize the verb blattero, blatterare, "blabber, babble."

Barlow 78: DE RANA ET VULPE. The word list does not recognize the adjectivesgloriabundus, "boasting, exulting," and circumstipatus, "packed in, surrounded." It also does not recognize the compound pronoun teipsum = te ipsum.

Barlow 79: DE SOLE ET VENTO. The word list does not recognize the verb emolior, emoliri, "force out, heave up."

Barlow 80: DE CANE ET LUPO. The word list doesn't recognize the interjection "ne" meaning "indeed, verily, assuredly" or the verb paeniteo, paenitere, "regret."

Irenaeus Fable 84: Aquila et Testudo Volans

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Testudine et Aquila, the story of the foolish turtle who wanted to fly. In Perry's indexing system, this is Perry 230.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Testudo videns Aquilam se pennarum remigio in altum levare, et multa aeris spatia facillime labore dimetiri, coepit desiderare sortem ipsius, saltem rogavit Aquilam, ut se in sublime portaret, ut posset hac voluptate frui, spectare et intueri caelum et terrarum tractus et maris; morem gessit Aquila cupiditati Testudinis, et ungue prehensam per inane sustulit, unde statim dimisit ex alto, meritas poenas dantem temerariae suae cupiditatis.

Testudo
videns Aquilam
se
pennarum remigio
in altum levare,
et multa aeris spatia
facillime labore dimetiri,
coepit desiderare sortem ipsius,
saltem rogavit Aquilam,
ut se in sublime portaret,
ut posset
hac voluptate frui,
spectare et intueri caelum
et terrarum tractus et maris;
morem gessit Aquila
cupiditati Testudinis,
et ungue prehensam
per inane sustulit,
unde statim
dimisit ex alto,
meritas poenas dantem
temerariae suae cupiditatis.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) by Stephanie Smith - and be sure to visit her website and blog for more great illustrations. She does fabulous work - wow!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Irenaeus Fable 83: Agricola et eius Militia Mercaturaque

I've embarked on a new Latin fable project here at the Latin Via Fables blog: digitizing the 300 fables in the Mithologica sacro-profana, seu florilegium fabularum by P. Irenaeus, published in 1666, which has recently become available at GoogleBooks. For a complete index of the fables in the book, with links to the fables I've digitized so far, check out the Aesopus wiki page at Aesopus.PBwiki.com.

Today's fable is De Agricola Militiam et Mercaturam probante, the story of a farmer who tried his hand at being a soldier and a merchant, with disastrous results. This is another fable from Abstemius.

To make reading the fable easier, I've provided a segmented version of the story below.

Quidam Agricola videns iuvenes sodales suos e militia redire divites, coepit de ineeunda militia cogitare, et taedere vitae prioris, tot laboribus exercitae, tam modicis compendiis; et venditis bobus, capris, ovibus, supellectile, emit equum et arma, et militiae nomen dedit. Non diu post, pugnatum est, sed infeliciter respectu novi militis, qui strenue licet decertans, cuncta quae habebat perdidit, et nil nisi vulnera multa recepit, militiae igitur renuntians, decrevit vacare mercaturae, ex qua maius lucrum, minus periculum speraret. Praediis igitur quae supererant venditiis, et inde comparatis mercibus, mari se commisit, fortunam retentaturus; sed infelicior, exorta tempestate, navi submersa, in undis periit, exemplum et spolium factus fallacis ac dolosae fortunae, ut satius sit, ipsi non credere et fidere, sed quemque sua sorte debere esse contentum.

Quidam Agricola
videns iuvenes sodales suos
e militia redire divites,
coepit
de ineeunda militia cogitare,
et taedere vitae prioris,
tot laboribus exercitae,
tam modicis compendiis;
et venditis
bobus, capris, ovibus, supellectile,
emit equum et arma,
et militiae nomen dedit.
Non diu post,
pugnatum est,
sed infeliciter
respectu novi militis,
qui strenue licet decertans,
cuncta quae habebat
perdidit,
et nil nisi vulnera multa recepit,
militiae igitur renuntians,
decrevit vacare mercaturae,
ex qua
maius lucrum,
minus periculum speraret.
Praediis igitur quae supererant
venditiis,
et inde comparatis mercibus,
mari se commisit,
fortunam retentaturus;
sed infelicior,
exorta tempestate,
navi submersa,
in undis periit,
exemplum et spolium factus
fallacis ac dolosae fortunae,
ut satius sit,
ipsi non credere et fidere,
sed
quemque
sua sorte
debere esse contentum.

Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) showing a shipwreck in the Honduras:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.